November 19, 2017

A Jam-Packed July in Golden: Upcoming Events

The Golden Fire Department's pancake breakfast (during Buffalo Bill Days) is just around the corner.

July 19, City Council Study Session
City Hall at 7 p.m. The agenda includes a presentation by the Bell Policy Center on the state’s fiscal challenges, a presentation by Jim Dale and Karen Oxman on Governor Hickenlooper’s TBD Colorado project inviting input from Coloradans on the challenges facing the state, and interviews for openings on the Golden Urban Renewal Board. You can review the agenda and watch the live screencast on the city’s website.

July 20, The Belle of Amherst opens at Miners Alley Playhouse
This is the latest opening at Miners Alley Playhouse. And don’t miss their Third Annual Wine Tasting (benefit event) on July 25 at Table Mountain Inn.

July 21, Golden Farmer’s Market
The Farmer’s Market runs every Saturday from 8am – 1pm through October 6 (with the exception of Buffalo Bill Days on July 28). If you haven’t been down yet this year, you’ll find it’s even bigger and better than last year.

July 25-29, Buffalo Bill Days
One of Golden’s signature annual events, this year’s Buffalo Bill Days festivities will include the Buffalo Bill Days Parade, the Golden Fire Department’s pancake breakfast, an orphan car and classic car show, a golf tournament, and plenty more.

July 26, City Council Business Meeting
City Hall at 7 p.m. You can review the agenda about a week before the meeting, and you watch the live screencast, all on the city’s website.

July 27, “Fairway to Fairness” golf tournament at Fossil Trace
This event supports the important work of Victim Outreach Information (helping victims of crime and trauma in Golden and in the rest of the county). For more information, email Vista Exline (vexline@msn.com).

July 31, Golden Super Cruise
The Golden Cruise is always the last Tuesday of the month, which means the next one is July 31. The action starts at Woody’s in downtown Golden at around 5:30pm with beer, free bike tune-ups, and plenty of frivolity. The Cruise starts at around 7pm.

August 3, First Friday Street Fair
Golden’s First Friday Street Fair continues in August. You’ll find inexpensive food, beer, music, kid-friendly entertainment, horse-drawn carriage rides, and more in historic downtown Golden from 5 – 10pm.

August 3, Movies & Music in the Park
The kickoff Movies & Music in the Park event for 2012 features Dr. Harlan’s Amazing Bluegrass Tonic at 7 and the family flick Puss in Boots starting at around 8:30. If the weather holds, you’ll find Movies & Music in the Park on August 10 and 17, as well.

August 4, Coffee With a Councilor
For folks living in the southern half of Golden, this is a chance to hear and ask questions of Councilor Saoirse Charis-Graves and other members of the City Council representing your part of town. I think this one will be 5th Ring Coffee House (2421 Ford St.) starting at 9 a.m.

August 4, Golden Super Cruise
The Golden Super Cruise is cruising’ this summer, with official festivities running from 5-9pm. There are Super Cruise evenings also scheduled for September 1 and October 6.

Two good websites for looking up other events in town are the city’s community calendar and Golden.com.

Hot Cakes and Buffalo Bill

The last few weeks have been so busy and full of great summer events that Buffalo Bill Days seems like ages ago, but of course it’s only been a few weeks. It was a great weekend in Golden, as was the Fine Arts Fest and the block parties and the Chamber bbq and the other community happenings since then. I don’t have numbers yet on any of the other events but I did learn this morning that nearly 2,000 people enjoyed participated in the Fire Department’s Buffalo Bill Days pancake breakfast, which puts it on par with last year (although they kept the lines a lot shorter by creating doubling the number of serving lines, which was great). Hats off to the GFD!

Councilor Marjorie Sloan worked the line all morning.

Golden's State Representative Max Tyler helped out as well.

The magicians behind the breakfast: Golden firefighters made it all happen.

Buffalo Bill's Golden Sesquicentennial

Rick Gardner’s writeup on the history of Buffalo Bill Days, William Cody, and Golden (with permission):

Buffalo Bill Days has arrived in Golden, celebrating the famed showman of the American West who became a celebrity still known worldwide nearly a century after he lived. However, this year’s celebration comes during a milestone anniversary of Buffalo Bill around here which is not well known but well worth noting, for his history in Golden does not begin as Buffalo Bill. It begins simply as William Frederick Cody, who was at Golden 150 years ago this year. He was then but 14 years old.

Cody grew up in Leavenworth, Kansas, a place well known to many who settled in Golden during the gold rush. However, one day Cody’s father made a public speech in favor of the abolition of slavery that so incensed pro-slavery audience members that he was attacked and stabbed, from which he never recovered and died in 1857. William, aged 11, was now the man of the household upon which others depended for income. He joined the wagon freighting firm of Russell, Majors & Waddell, gaining a close working relationship with its proprietors who knew him to be unusually big and strong for his age, capable of junior teamster work.

When gold was discovered in Colorado, it gained Cody’s attention, and he arrived here among the gold rushers in 1859 at the age of 13. Like many others he didn’t make much money in gold, but he did earn a living as a driver here. His route took him from Denver, through Golden, up Mt. Vernon Canyon and on up to Idaho Springs. A known freight driver, he may have also been a junior driver for stagecoaches. Having worked for Russell, Majors & Waddell, he either drove for them directly, or possibly for either the Leavenworth & Pike’s Peak Express or the Central Overland California & Pike’s Peak Express, which were each connected with the firm. In this way the young Cody continued to earn money to send back home and support his family.

Cody’s connection with Russell, Majors & Waddell was most opportune when later in 1860 they started the Pony Express, for which Cody became a rider, and began becoming famous. He served in the Civil War, hunted buffalo for the railroads for which he earned his famed nickname, was an Army scout and much more, finally becoming the famed showman regaling audiences with his renditions of the American West. He also became an advocate for conserving the buffalo he once hunted, for American Indians, and giving women equal pay. But he never forgot his early days here. As his career was going into its twilight, on December 8, 1907 he returned to Golden, not on a horse but in an automobile, spending an hour at the Avenue Hotel at 1211 Washington Avenue before resuming his journey. His purpose was a trip down memory lane, or in this case a trip up the old trail upon which he once drove those many years ago. It appears to be an early indication of the fondness he held for this place for which he chose on his deathbed to be buried here 10 years later.

Over 25,000 people came to his funeral on Lookout Mountain, which remains the largest Golden area funeral on record, and Golden adopted its onetime pioneer teamster as their own. On August 9, 1919 the first airplane to soar over the city dropped flowers on his grave. In 1921 Pahaska Tepee was built atop Lookout Mountain to house the Buffalo Bill Museum where it is a historic landmark today, and Goldenites have helped resist any ideas of moving his grave to Cody, Wyoming. On August 15-18, 1946, in commemoration of his 100th birthday, Goldenites began Buffalo Bill Days, with a carnival, soap box derby, fireworks, tug-of-war, baseball, races, dance, air show, beauty contest, the chance to eat buffalo meat, and Pioneer Day Parade. In the years since like Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show it has had its own twists and turns, going so far to include Denver activities, rodeos on South Table Mountain and an automobile race up Mt. Zion in the early 1950s, tapering to the Buffalo Bill Saddle Club’s trail rides up the same mountain in the late 1950s (which they have done every Buffalo Bill Days since 1947), then surging again with a parade in the 1960s, and a whole lot more including food, arts and crafts, and the Golden Fire Department’s Pancake Breakfast. In the 2000s elements of cars and rodeo have returned, and the Wild West Show is performed on the very street Cody once drove in the old west. This year celebrates the 65th installment of Buffalo Bill Days, Golden’s community celebration which comes on the 150th anniversary of one of its historic pioneers.

Buffalo Bill’s Golden Sesquicentennial

Rick Gardner’s writeup on the history of Buffalo Bill Days, William Cody, and Golden (with permission):

Buffalo Bill Days has arrived in Golden, celebrating the famed showman of the American West who became a celebrity still known worldwide nearly a century after he lived. However, this year’s celebration comes during a milestone anniversary of Buffalo Bill around here which is not well known but well worth noting, for his history in Golden does not begin as Buffalo Bill. It begins simply as William Frederick Cody, who was at Golden 150 years ago this year. He was then but 14 years old.

Cody grew up in Leavenworth, Kansas, a place well known to many who settled in Golden during the gold rush. However, one day Cody’s father made a public speech in favor of the abolition of slavery that so incensed pro-slavery audience members that he was attacked and stabbed, from which he never recovered and died in 1857. William, aged 11, was now the man of the household upon which others depended for income. He joined the wagon freighting firm of Russell, Majors & Waddell, gaining a close working relationship with its proprietors who knew him to be unusually big and strong for his age, capable of junior teamster work.

When gold was discovered in Colorado, it gained Cody’s attention, and he arrived here among the gold rushers in 1859 at the age of 13. Like many others he didn’t make much money in gold, but he did earn a living as a driver here. His route took him from Denver, through Golden, up Mt. Vernon Canyon and on up to Idaho Springs. A known freight driver, he may have also been a junior driver for stagecoaches. Having worked for Russell, Majors & Waddell, he either drove for them directly, or possibly for either the Leavenworth & Pike’s Peak Express or the Central Overland California & Pike’s Peak Express, which were each connected with the firm. In this way the young Cody continued to earn money to send back home and support his family.

Cody’s connection with Russell, Majors & Waddell was most opportune when later in 1860 they started the Pony Express, for which Cody became a rider, and began becoming famous. He served in the Civil War, hunted buffalo for the railroads for which he earned his famed nickname, was an Army scout and much more, finally becoming the famed showman regaling audiences with his renditions of the American West. He also became an advocate for conserving the buffalo he once hunted, for American Indians, and giving women equal pay. But he never forgot his early days here. As his career was going into its twilight, on December 8, 1907 he returned to Golden, not on a horse but in an automobile, spending an hour at the Avenue Hotel at 1211 Washington Avenue before resuming his journey. His purpose was a trip down memory lane, or in this case a trip up the old trail upon which he once drove those many years ago. It appears to be an early indication of the fondness he held for this place for which he chose on his deathbed to be buried here 10 years later.

Over 25,000 people came to his funeral on Lookout Mountain, which remains the largest Golden area funeral on record, and Golden adopted its onetime pioneer teamster as their own. On August 9, 1919 the first airplane to soar over the city dropped flowers on his grave. In 1921 Pahaska Tepee was built atop Lookout Mountain to house the Buffalo Bill Museum where it is a historic landmark today, and Goldenites have helped resist any ideas of moving his grave to Cody, Wyoming. On August 15-18, 1946, in commemoration of his 100th birthday, Goldenites began Buffalo Bill Days, with a carnival, soap box derby, fireworks, tug-of-war, baseball, races, dance, air show, beauty contest, the chance to eat buffalo meat, and Pioneer Day Parade. In the years since like Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show it has had its own twists and turns, going so far to include Denver activities, rodeos on South Table Mountain and an automobile race up Mt. Zion in the early 1950s, tapering to the Buffalo Bill Saddle Club’s trail rides up the same mountain in the late 1950s (which they have done every Buffalo Bill Days since 1947), then surging again with a parade in the 1960s, and a whole lot more including food, arts and crafts, and the Golden Fire Department’s Pancake Breakfast. In the 2000s elements of cars and rodeo have returned, and the Wild West Show is performed on the very street Cody once drove in the old west. This year celebrates the 65th installment of Buffalo Bill Days, Golden’s community celebration which comes on the 150th anniversary of one of its historic pioneers.

Buffalo Bill Days 2010

A view from up high of the very long line at the GFD pancake breakfast.

We had another great Buffalo Bill Days, with terrific weather, great crowds, an outstanding parade and family-friendly fun, and yet another spectacular Golden Fire Department pancake breakfast performance. Hats off to all the organizers and volunteers and city staff and parade participants that made it happen.

I posted some more photos on my Facebook page, and I just posted a short Buffalo Bill Days 2010 video (including the dramatic fire department pancake toss and a couple from the parade) as well. The Golden Fire Department served 2,000 people!