December 8, 2019

The History of Golden's Neighborhood Names

Rick Gardner, Golden’s unofficial historian, wrote up a great review of the history of neighborhood names in Golden. Since this year we’ll spend some energy focusing on strengthening our neighborhoods through the Neighborhood Grant Program and an updated Comprehensive Plan, I thought it would be worth sharing his write-up (with his permission, of course):

Historically Golden was made up of two macro areas:  simply the North Side, and the South Side, divided by the river.  The North Side was more blue collar, the South Side more genteel, and there was cultural rivalry beyond geographics.  The original heart of both is the Original Town, called so on the plat.  From here Golden was made up of these neighborhoods and areas:

9th Street (N of Clear Creek, S of Highway 58, W of Arapahoe Gulch), blue collar neighborhood with industries part of it.  Originally known as Garrison Street, the original name of 9th Street.

12th Street (S of Clear Creek, W of Arapahoe, N of alley between 13th and 14th), upper middle class neighborhood of merchants and prominent citizens.  11th Street was heart of Swedish immigrant community.  Originally known as 2nd Street, the original name of 12th Street.  Eastern extreme now part of Downtown, southern extreme now part of CSM campus.

Allen’s Addition (Cluster of older homes at west 19th and Pinal Road area), named for developer Maynard C. Allen.  Upper middle class semirural estate type neighborhood created by Allen around historic farmhouse in 1920s.

Bible Flats (N of Highway 58, W of Washington, E of Canyon Point), likely named after the Swedish Lutheran Church that historically overlooked it from 5th and Washington (a poor immigrant church, the 1st Swedish church in Colorado and likely Rocky Mountains).  A middle-class-type neighborhood which developed from the 1880s-1940s.

Bunzel’s Addition (pronounced “BOON-zel”)(S of 24th Street, E of South Golden Road/Ford), named after developer Everett Bunzel.  Mixed use suburban neighborhood anchored by bowling alley developed in the 1950s.

Cemetery Hill (hill bounded by Washington, 2nd, 5th and Ford), named for the cemetery which existed nearly a century at its crest.  Developed by Joseph Dennis in the 1950s.  Also known as Graveyard Hill or Observatory Block as it was originally platted.

City Park Heights (S of 18th Street, W of Washington, E of Illinois, N of alley between 19th and 20th), named by 1890s-era realtor for City Park which formerly existed in area N of 18th, W of Arapahoe, S of 16th and E of Illinois.  Upper class neighborhood of CSM professors and prominent citizens, includes early sister school of CSM.  Park area was originally called the Public Square, also Pioneer Park, but City Park Heights is only known proper identity for the neighborhood itself.

College Hill (S of 15th Street, W of Miners Alley, E of Elm, N of 18th, excluded City Park), named after School of Mines.  Upper class neighborhood of professors, prominent citizens and CSM fraternity houses.

Court House Hill (E of Miners Alley, W of Jackson, N of midblock between 16th and 17th, S of 14th), named after Jefferson County Courthouse that stood at SE corner 15th and Washington.  Upper class neighborhood of attorneys, judges, and prominent citizens.  Includes Golden’s oldest remaining schoolhouse and Presbyterian church.

Dogtown (between Tucker Gulch and alley E of Boyd Street), likely named after prairie dog colonies in its area.  Middle class neighborhood developed by Thomas L. Clark in 1879 after he’d been ridiculed for getting worthless farmland, but he had the last laugh.  Also known as Clark’s Garden Addition.

Downtown (Highway 58 to Jackson Street extended, S to Clear Creek, E to East Street extended, S to 14th Street, W to Arapahoe Street + Calvary Church, N to Clear Creek, E to Arapahoe Gulch, N to Highway 58), the commercial, societal and cultural heart of Golden, historically part residential as well.

Golden Park Addition (N of 2nd, E of Washington, W of Ford, S of midblock north of Iowa), given name by 1873 platters William A.H. Loveland and Dr. Levi Harsh.  Never had a public park, therefore likely named similar to genteel names of the east.  Developed as middle class neighborhood after World War II.

Goosetown (W of Ford, N of Clear Creek, S of Highway 58, to eastern limits), reportedly named after either Adolph Coors’ flock of geese or the laughter of the women there.  German immigrant neighborhood which grew up around the railroad depot.  Goosetown Tavern on East Colfax Avenue was a historic business of Goosetown which was rescued and reopened by John Hickenlooper in the late 1990s.  SW extremity of Goosetown originally part of Downtown.

Skunk Hollow (E end of High Parkway), one can guess the reasoning behind its name.  Rural interface neighborhood platted by Edward L. Berthoud in 1879.  Parade fire engine is named after it.  Also known as Berthoud’s Addition.

South Ford Street (E of Kinney Run, W of Welch Ditch, N of 24th, S of 14th), suburban and semirural neighborhood created in the 1870s and filled in through the 1940s, with commercial along Ford and at southern gateways.  Also known as East Street in recent years.

Sunshine Park (W of midblock east of Boyd, N of Highway 58, between Dogtown and Skunk Hollow), post-World War II suburban neighborhood.

Tom Cat Hill (S of 5th, E of Washington, W of Ford, N of Highway 58), one can guess how it got its name.  Middle class neighborhood which included the Swedish Lutheran Church and North School.

The campuses of the Colorado School of Mines and Lookout youth detention facility (originally State Industrial School) and Magic Mountain (Heritage Square) are historic areas in their own right.  The latter two of these, along with parts of 4 gold rush ghost town sites at the western and eastern edges of the city, and the Brickyard area are places of historic identity which have been annexed into the Golden limits.  The Grampsas Park vicinity was historically known as Orchard Home.  Golden has annexed into Pleasant View, long ago known as the Cold Spring Ranch.  Within neighborhoods are sub-areas or places autonomous from any area.  These include Kinney’s Addition (original core of South Ford Street at its north end, named for developer Calvin Kinney), Miller Place (NW part of 9th St. area, named for developer Jack Miller), Dog Hollow (Coors Wellness Center vicinity), lower 11th Street (Golden’s Chinese community), Paradise Alley (NW extremity of Goosetown, of ill repute), Golden Tourist Park (Big Tree at 22nd and Jackson, aka Sapp’s Grove), a couple areas of veterans’s homes (on 2nd Street and 23rd Street), Mines Park, Prospector Park, East Tincup (old theme park area north of Dakota Ridge RV Park, named after Pete Smythe’s fictional old west town), the Flatiron Tract (triangle bounded by 24th, Ford and South Golden Road, likely named for its shape), the row of the 2300 block of East Street, and Goldcrest (Washington Circle area, first called Goldcrest Circle).  Harmony Village and Kinney Run just about modern counterparts.

Certain places, such as the area south of City Park Heights and west of South Ford Street, have clearly been historic neighborhoods, but collective identities for them either never existed or have so far eluded me.  Many post-World War II developments have specific neighborhood names like Golden Heights, Darling View Heights, Beverly Heights, Mesa Meadows, Rimrock, Canyon Point, Mountain Ridge, Canyon View (2 of them!), Heritage Dells, Eagle Ridge, Southridge, and more.  Cemetery Hill has also been used for the area of the rise where Ulysses Park and the current Golden Cemetery are.

The History of Golden’s Neighborhood Names

Rick Gardner, Golden’s unofficial historian, wrote up a great review of the history of neighborhood names in Golden. Since this year we’ll spend some energy focusing on strengthening our neighborhoods through the Neighborhood Grant Program and an updated Comprehensive Plan, I thought it would be worth sharing his write-up (with his permission, of course):

Historically Golden was made up of two macro areas:  simply the North Side, and the South Side, divided by the river.  The North Side was more blue collar, the South Side more genteel, and there was cultural rivalry beyond geographics.  The original heart of both is the Original Town, called so on the plat.  From here Golden was made up of these neighborhoods and areas:

9th Street (N of Clear Creek, S of Highway 58, W of Arapahoe Gulch), blue collar neighborhood with industries part of it.  Originally known as Garrison Street, the original name of 9th Street.

12th Street (S of Clear Creek, W of Arapahoe, N of alley between 13th and 14th), upper middle class neighborhood of merchants and prominent citizens.  11th Street was heart of Swedish immigrant community.  Originally known as 2nd Street, the original name of 12th Street.  Eastern extreme now part of Downtown, southern extreme now part of CSM campus.

Allen’s Addition (Cluster of older homes at west 19th and Pinal Road area), named for developer Maynard C. Allen.  Upper middle class semirural estate type neighborhood created by Allen around historic farmhouse in 1920s.

Bible Flats (N of Highway 58, W of Washington, E of Canyon Point), likely named after the Swedish Lutheran Church that historically overlooked it from 5th and Washington (a poor immigrant church, the 1st Swedish church in Colorado and likely Rocky Mountains).  A middle-class-type neighborhood which developed from the 1880s-1940s.

Bunzel’s Addition (pronounced “BOON-zel”)(S of 24th Street, E of South Golden Road/Ford), named after developer Everett Bunzel.  Mixed use suburban neighborhood anchored by bowling alley developed in the 1950s.

Cemetery Hill (hill bounded by Washington, 2nd, 5th and Ford), named for the cemetery which existed nearly a century at its crest.  Developed by Joseph Dennis in the 1950s.  Also known as Graveyard Hill or Observatory Block as it was originally platted.

City Park Heights (S of 18th Street, W of Washington, E of Illinois, N of alley between 19th and 20th), named by 1890s-era realtor for City Park which formerly existed in area N of 18th, W of Arapahoe, S of 16th and E of Illinois.  Upper class neighborhood of CSM professors and prominent citizens, includes early sister school of CSM.  Park area was originally called the Public Square, also Pioneer Park, but City Park Heights is only known proper identity for the neighborhood itself.

College Hill (S of 15th Street, W of Miners Alley, E of Elm, N of 18th, excluded City Park), named after School of Mines.  Upper class neighborhood of professors, prominent citizens and CSM fraternity houses.

Court House Hill (E of Miners Alley, W of Jackson, N of midblock between 16th and 17th, S of 14th), named after Jefferson County Courthouse that stood at SE corner 15th and Washington.  Upper class neighborhood of attorneys, judges, and prominent citizens.  Includes Golden’s oldest remaining schoolhouse and Presbyterian church.

Dogtown (between Tucker Gulch and alley E of Boyd Street), likely named after prairie dog colonies in its area.  Middle class neighborhood developed by Thomas L. Clark in 1879 after he’d been ridiculed for getting worthless farmland, but he had the last laugh.  Also known as Clark’s Garden Addition.

Downtown (Highway 58 to Jackson Street extended, S to Clear Creek, E to East Street extended, S to 14th Street, W to Arapahoe Street + Calvary Church, N to Clear Creek, E to Arapahoe Gulch, N to Highway 58), the commercial, societal and cultural heart of Golden, historically part residential as well.

Golden Park Addition (N of 2nd, E of Washington, W of Ford, S of midblock north of Iowa), given name by 1873 platters William A.H. Loveland and Dr. Levi Harsh.  Never had a public park, therefore likely named similar to genteel names of the east.  Developed as middle class neighborhood after World War II.

Goosetown (W of Ford, N of Clear Creek, S of Highway 58, to eastern limits), reportedly named after either Adolph Coors’ flock of geese or the laughter of the women there.  German immigrant neighborhood which grew up around the railroad depot.  Goosetown Tavern on East Colfax Avenue was a historic business of Goosetown which was rescued and reopened by John Hickenlooper in the late 1990s.  SW extremity of Goosetown originally part of Downtown.

Skunk Hollow (E end of High Parkway), one can guess the reasoning behind its name.  Rural interface neighborhood platted by Edward L. Berthoud in 1879.  Parade fire engine is named after it.  Also known as Berthoud’s Addition.

South Ford Street (E of Kinney Run, W of Welch Ditch, N of 24th, S of 14th), suburban and semirural neighborhood created in the 1870s and filled in through the 1940s, with commercial along Ford and at southern gateways.  Also known as East Street in recent years.

Sunshine Park (W of midblock east of Boyd, N of Highway 58, between Dogtown and Skunk Hollow), post-World War II suburban neighborhood.

Tom Cat Hill (S of 5th, E of Washington, W of Ford, N of Highway 58), one can guess how it got its name.  Middle class neighborhood which included the Swedish Lutheran Church and North School.

The campuses of the Colorado School of Mines and Lookout youth detention facility (originally State Industrial School) and Magic Mountain (Heritage Square) are historic areas in their own right.  The latter two of these, along with parts of 4 gold rush ghost town sites at the western and eastern edges of the city, and the Brickyard area are places of historic identity which have been annexed into the Golden limits.  The Grampsas Park vicinity was historically known as Orchard Home.  Golden has annexed into Pleasant View, long ago known as the Cold Spring Ranch.  Within neighborhoods are sub-areas or places autonomous from any area.  These include Kinney’s Addition (original core of South Ford Street at its north end, named for developer Calvin Kinney), Miller Place (NW part of 9th St. area, named for developer Jack Miller), Dog Hollow (Coors Wellness Center vicinity), lower 11th Street (Golden’s Chinese community), Paradise Alley (NW extremity of Goosetown, of ill repute), Golden Tourist Park (Big Tree at 22nd and Jackson, aka Sapp’s Grove), a couple areas of veterans’s homes (on 2nd Street and 23rd Street), Mines Park, Prospector Park, East Tincup (old theme park area north of Dakota Ridge RV Park, named after Pete Smythe’s fictional old west town), the Flatiron Tract (triangle bounded by 24th, Ford and South Golden Road, likely named for its shape), the row of the 2300 block of East Street, and Goldcrest (Washington Circle area, first called Goldcrest Circle).  Harmony Village and Kinney Run just about modern counterparts.

Certain places, such as the area south of City Park Heights and west of South Ford Street, have clearly been historic neighborhoods, but collective identities for them either never existed or have so far eluded me.  Many post-World War II developments have specific neighborhood names like Golden Heights, Darling View Heights, Beverly Heights, Mesa Meadows, Rimrock, Canyon Point, Mountain Ridge, Canyon View (2 of them!), Heritage Dells, Eagle Ridge, Southridge, and more.  Cemetery Hill has also been used for the area of the rise where Ulysses Park and the current Golden Cemetery are.

Jacob's Golden Update: Fixing the Ethics Code Loophole

Jacob’s Golden Update: April 22, 2009
Happy Earth Day!

1. Fixing the Ethics Code Loophole
2. Eliminating the Campaign Finance Loophole
3. All-Ward Town Hall Meeting: May 5
4. Redeveloping the Area Across From the High School
5. Free Horizon Montessori Recognized as a High Performing School
6. Council Approves Golden Community Garden
7. Parks and Recreation Board Opening: Deadline April 30
8. Improving Disabled Access in Golden
9. Council Selects Plan for Pedestrian Improvements on Kimball and Crawford
10. Creating a “Moderate Housing Pool” Under the City’s Growth Limit
11. Other Upcoming Events
12. Next City Council Meeting: Thursday, April 23

[Read more…]

Jacob’s Golden Update: Fixing the Ethics Code Loophole

Jacob’s Golden Update: April 22, 2009
Happy Earth Day!

1. Fixing the Ethics Code Loophole
2. Eliminating the Campaign Finance Loophole
3. All-Ward Town Hall Meeting: May 5
4. Redeveloping the Area Across From the High School
5. Free Horizon Montessori Recognized as a High Performing School
6. Council Approves Golden Community Garden
7. Parks and Recreation Board Opening: Deadline April 30
8. Improving Disabled Access in Golden
9. Council Selects Plan for Pedestrian Improvements on Kimball and Crawford
10. Creating a “Moderate Housing Pool” Under the City’s Growth Limit
11. Other Upcoming Events
12. Next City Council Meeting: Thursday, April 23

[Read more…]