October 20, 2018

City Council’s Retreat: Setting the Agenda for 2012-2013

The first priority on City Council's list for 2012-2013 is supporting Golden's schools and libraries.


The Golden City Council held its biannual retreat earlier in February, focusing on their work plan for the next two years. They identified nine general areas they want to focus on: (1) supporting Golden’s schools and libraries; (2) improving public space; (3) promoting a healthy community; (4) moving the ball forward on key transportation issues; (5) strengthening Golden’s neighborhoods; (6) fostering a strong relationship with Colorado School of Mines; (7) supporting a strong economy; (8) improving on the city’s capital improvement plan; and (9) meeting the city’s sustainability goals. It’s a great list but also a pretty expansive one, and I’m looking forward to learning more about how Council is planning to prioritize among those goals.

Coyote 5k/1 mile Fun Run: Sunday at Shelton

Another weekend, more terrific community events in Golden. One of the highlights this weekend: the Coyote 5k race and 1 mile fun run at Shelton Elementary. It’s a family-friendly neighborhood-oriented event supported by Golden’s new i-Neighborhood grant program. Hope to see you there.

Golden Fire Update: March 30, 2011

"Thank You Firefighters" The photo is a little awkward but the sentiment isn't. Golden firefighters were very excited to see this written in chalk on a street in Mountain Ridge.

The Fire
We haven’t seen any sort of official notice that the fire is completely out – it might actually take a while – but for all intents and purposes the Indian Gulch Fire is done. Jefferson County crews spent the weekend getting a few hot spots and doing some mitigation work behind Mountain Ridge (where fire crews had dug fire line). There may be some more mop up on the fire, and there will be more mitigation work required as well, but the fire itself is over.

The fire wrap-up: It burned a total of 1,570 acres. No homes were lost and there were no injuries. The city’s emergency response systems worked extremely well, and our staff is already analyzing what we did, where the few hiccups were, and how to do it even better next time (whenever it is that next time comes). Jefferson County Sheriff Ted Mink deserves a special mention: his department did a great job coordinating the response, managing the dozens of agencies that sent crews to help, and managing the handoff to the federal incident team when they arrived.

Kudos
As you all know, our firefighters did a fantastic job all the way through the fire and even afterward (we sent a crew down to Douglas County to help them with their own fire). I also want to call out the many other City of Golden staff that stepped up. Our water department focused on keeping the water pressure up, Parks & Recreation de-winterized the Splash in a matter of hours so that we could provide firefighters with hot showers and a place to stage, our police department worked hard to make sure our firefighters had the room and access they needed, the communications team was in overdrive, and so on. And the work continues even now, such as the work our streets crew is doing to protect our water supply.

Plenty of folks posted information, photos, and stories during the fire, but I want to call out two in particular:

Councilor Bill Fisher did something cool as well, pulling together news articles and other links. I’d love to know about any other web sites or blogs where folks posted their images, recollections, and other info. That was a week to remember, for sure.

Lessons
I learned a lot this past week, not the least of which was the power of Facebook and Twitter during a crisis for both sharing information and listening, and Council Fisher and I will gather our thoughts and share what we learned in the next few weeks. In the meantime, I also learned that the fire retardant slurry dropped by the air tankers also contains some fertilizer and seed to help with revegetation after the fire.

Celebrating
Finally, among the most amusing and heartwarming moments for me was hearing so many Mountain Ridge residents express their deepest gratitude to the firefighters and insist on throwing a party to thank them, while simultaneously hearing our firefighters express their deepest gratitude to the Mountain Ridge residents, and insist on throwing a party to thank them! Chief Bales mentioned the other day that you usually have to worry about your firefighters losing too much weight during a fire, and he joked that his firefighters were so well fed and cared for by the Mountain Ridge neighborhood that he was worried last week about the opposite. In any case, this seems like a win-win opportunity for everyone to throw a party, thank each other for stepping up as only Golden neighbors can do, and express our collective gratitude that we didn’t lose any homes or suffer any injuries. I’m under the impression that the Mountain Ridge folks actually want to plan something in the coming weeks, and the City, City Council, and I are all happy to help and support. Whoever has already started to plan this please let me know and we can make sure everyone is on the same page.

I can’t say enough about this community, and every hour of the fire I was reminded how blessed I am to get to live here. Neighbors looked out for each other, people came to help Golden and Jefferson County from all over the state, community organizations banded together to provide even more aid and support, and despite the number of moving parts and the potential for chaos we somehow all made it work. Even our use of email, Twitter, and Facebook – among the things that Councilor Fisher and I focused on – wouldn’t have worked so well if so many other folks didn’t repost, retweet, and forward. Even the communication efforts ended up being an incredible community collaboration.

My heartfelt thanks to everyone.

City Council Adopts 2011 Priorities

On Thursday night City Council formally adopted priorities for 2011.  This is generally a continuation of the priorities we established last year, but it’s worth formally identifying them to help us stay focused and help keep the community informed about what we are focused on.

We adopted five major priorities:

1) Protecting the city’s financial health and sustaining the community’s economic vitality.

2) Supporting and strengthening our neighborhoods (“The Year of the Neighborhood”), including implementing our new neighborhood grant program, completing pending neighborhood plans, and considering all of the policy recommendations in the adopted ones.

3) Maintaining our aggressive efforts to keep the beltway out of Golden and working to protect Golden from the impacts of growing regional through the Golden Plan or similar improvements.

4) Updating the Comprehensive Plan and revamping/updating the land use process to give neighborhoods a stronger voice in shaping their own future and to make the process less adversarial and combative.

5) Revisiting and updating the city’s long-term streets plan.

Other 2011 priorities include:

1) Making sure Golden is ready for light rail in 2013, including our own community bus.

2) Adopting a preliminary strategic transportation plan (in advance of preparing a thorough one in 2012).

3) Finalize our new performance evaluation system for the city and city manager, including performance metrics

4) Review and update the long-term plans for the city’s major recreational facilities.

5) Update the city’s economic development tools, structures, and strategies. This may extend into 2012.

6) Support the Quiznos Pro Challenge Professional Bicycle Race.

And some additional 2011 projects:

1) CSM Master Plan (although the timing is up to Colorado School of Mines).

2) Clear Creek Master Plan.

3) Evaluate and consider sewer/waterline insurance. DONE – Council decided to educate community members about the value of having this insurance but not to enter into a special agreement with any specific insurance providers.

4) Consider adjusting the cost of special use permits for chickens. DONE – Council reduced the special use permit fee for keeping up to six hens.

5) Evaluate and potentially update the strategy for managing amplified outdoor music.

6) Evaluate and consider updating traffic fine schedule.

7) Evaluate and consider updating leash laws.

8) Initiate long-term city financial health evaluation.

9) Evaluate and update medical marijuana regulations.

10) Update noise mitigation priorities.

11) Complete the City of Golden web site revamp.

12) Further development, testing, and training on the new Emergency Operations Plan (primarily staff).

13) Plan for major software updates (finance, planning, police, fire, courts) (primarily

14) Major public works projects: South Reservoir and office building reconstruction (primarily staff).

15) East Downtown Vision and Plan (potentially).

Golden's Bible Flats Neighborhood

Every now and again I make reference to the historic name of my own neighborhood north of Highway 58: Bible Flats.  I’m not advocating for or against the revival of the name, but Golden’s unofficial historian Rick Gardner periodically offers really interesting background on where the name came from and on its use over time.

A few years back, though, a Golden native emailed me explaining that she was born in the neighborhood Rick calls Bible Flats and that she’d never heard it called that.  I asked Rick, and he wrote the following:

On the identity of Bible Flats, it doesn’t surprise me one could live a lifetime there and not hear of the name.  The Swedish church itself was torn down under City pressure in 1933 and has almost completely vanished from Golden’s collective living memory.  I’d bet this name hasn’t been in active use for over a century.  The neighborhood has one of the sketchiest histories of any in Golden; it’s a wonder I ever found any name for it.  This name comes from a mysterious map I was given from a man whom I considered credible but don’t remember the name of, some years ago.  The map’s purpose is to tell old neighborhood names, made sometime after Mesa Meadows was built.  I have to believe the map is credible because it is accurate, correctly placing the names of Cemetery Hill, Dogtown, Goosetown, Skunk Hollow and Mesa Meadows, for which I have corroborating evidence.  Only the names of Bible Flats and Tom Cat Hill on the map do not, but based on the rest I should believe it’s credible until proven otherwise and expect at some point in the future I’ll encounter other evidence on those names.  Nobody remembering the name Bible Flats tells me its active use in the community was likely over a century ago, during the 1870s-90s when the church was in its heyday.  Bible Flats should be recognized as an identity of heritage, but one can see why the neighbors might want to create for active use an identity descriptive of them now!

Golden’s Bible Flats Neighborhood

Every now and again I make reference to the historic name of my own neighborhood north of Highway 58: Bible Flats.  I’m not advocating for or against the revival of the name, but Golden’s unofficial historian Rick Gardner periodically offers really interesting background on where the name came from and on its use over time.

A few years back, though, a Golden native emailed me explaining that she was born in the neighborhood Rick calls Bible Flats and that she’d never heard it called that.  I asked Rick, and he wrote the following:

On the identity of Bible Flats, it doesn’t surprise me one could live a lifetime there and not hear of the name.  The Swedish church itself was torn down under City pressure in 1933 and has almost completely vanished from Golden’s collective living memory.  I’d bet this name hasn’t been in active use for over a century.  The neighborhood has one of the sketchiest histories of any in Golden; it’s a wonder I ever found any name for it.  This name comes from a mysterious map I was given from a man whom I considered credible but don’t remember the name of, some years ago.  The map’s purpose is to tell old neighborhood names, made sometime after Mesa Meadows was built.  I have to believe the map is credible because it is accurate, correctly placing the names of Cemetery Hill, Dogtown, Goosetown, Skunk Hollow and Mesa Meadows, for which I have corroborating evidence.  Only the names of Bible Flats and Tom Cat Hill on the map do not, but based on the rest I should believe it’s credible until proven otherwise and expect at some point in the future I’ll encounter other evidence on those names.  Nobody remembering the name Bible Flats tells me its active use in the community was likely over a century ago, during the 1870s-90s when the church was in its heyday.  Bible Flats should be recognized as an identity of heritage, but one can see why the neighbors might want to create for active use an identity descriptive of them now!

The History of Golden's Neighborhood Names

Rick Gardner, Golden’s unofficial historian, wrote up a great review of the history of neighborhood names in Golden. Since this year we’ll spend some energy focusing on strengthening our neighborhoods through the Neighborhood Grant Program and an updated Comprehensive Plan, I thought it would be worth sharing his write-up (with his permission, of course):

Historically Golden was made up of two macro areas:  simply the North Side, and the South Side, divided by the river.  The North Side was more blue collar, the South Side more genteel, and there was cultural rivalry beyond geographics.  The original heart of both is the Original Town, called so on the plat.  From here Golden was made up of these neighborhoods and areas:

9th Street (N of Clear Creek, S of Highway 58, W of Arapahoe Gulch), blue collar neighborhood with industries part of it.  Originally known as Garrison Street, the original name of 9th Street.

12th Street (S of Clear Creek, W of Arapahoe, N of alley between 13th and 14th), upper middle class neighborhood of merchants and prominent citizens.  11th Street was heart of Swedish immigrant community.  Originally known as 2nd Street, the original name of 12th Street.  Eastern extreme now part of Downtown, southern extreme now part of CSM campus.

Allen’s Addition (Cluster of older homes at west 19th and Pinal Road area), named for developer Maynard C. Allen.  Upper middle class semirural estate type neighborhood created by Allen around historic farmhouse in 1920s.

Bible Flats (N of Highway 58, W of Washington, E of Canyon Point), likely named after the Swedish Lutheran Church that historically overlooked it from 5th and Washington (a poor immigrant church, the 1st Swedish church in Colorado and likely Rocky Mountains).  A middle-class-type neighborhood which developed from the 1880s-1940s.

Bunzel’s Addition (pronounced “BOON-zel”)(S of 24th Street, E of South Golden Road/Ford), named after developer Everett Bunzel.  Mixed use suburban neighborhood anchored by bowling alley developed in the 1950s.

Cemetery Hill (hill bounded by Washington, 2nd, 5th and Ford), named for the cemetery which existed nearly a century at its crest.  Developed by Joseph Dennis in the 1950s.  Also known as Graveyard Hill or Observatory Block as it was originally platted.

City Park Heights (S of 18th Street, W of Washington, E of Illinois, N of alley between 19th and 20th), named by 1890s-era realtor for City Park which formerly existed in area N of 18th, W of Arapahoe, S of 16th and E of Illinois.  Upper class neighborhood of CSM professors and prominent citizens, includes early sister school of CSM.  Park area was originally called the Public Square, also Pioneer Park, but City Park Heights is only known proper identity for the neighborhood itself.

College Hill (S of 15th Street, W of Miners Alley, E of Elm, N of 18th, excluded City Park), named after School of Mines.  Upper class neighborhood of professors, prominent citizens and CSM fraternity houses.

Court House Hill (E of Miners Alley, W of Jackson, N of midblock between 16th and 17th, S of 14th), named after Jefferson County Courthouse that stood at SE corner 15th and Washington.  Upper class neighborhood of attorneys, judges, and prominent citizens.  Includes Golden’s oldest remaining schoolhouse and Presbyterian church.

Dogtown (between Tucker Gulch and alley E of Boyd Street), likely named after prairie dog colonies in its area.  Middle class neighborhood developed by Thomas L. Clark in 1879 after he’d been ridiculed for getting worthless farmland, but he had the last laugh.  Also known as Clark’s Garden Addition.

Downtown (Highway 58 to Jackson Street extended, S to Clear Creek, E to East Street extended, S to 14th Street, W to Arapahoe Street + Calvary Church, N to Clear Creek, E to Arapahoe Gulch, N to Highway 58), the commercial, societal and cultural heart of Golden, historically part residential as well.

Golden Park Addition (N of 2nd, E of Washington, W of Ford, S of midblock north of Iowa), given name by 1873 platters William A.H. Loveland and Dr. Levi Harsh.  Never had a public park, therefore likely named similar to genteel names of the east.  Developed as middle class neighborhood after World War II.

Goosetown (W of Ford, N of Clear Creek, S of Highway 58, to eastern limits), reportedly named after either Adolph Coors’ flock of geese or the laughter of the women there.  German immigrant neighborhood which grew up around the railroad depot.  Goosetown Tavern on East Colfax Avenue was a historic business of Goosetown which was rescued and reopened by John Hickenlooper in the late 1990s.  SW extremity of Goosetown originally part of Downtown.

Skunk Hollow (E end of High Parkway), one can guess the reasoning behind its name.  Rural interface neighborhood platted by Edward L. Berthoud in 1879.  Parade fire engine is named after it.  Also known as Berthoud’s Addition.

South Ford Street (E of Kinney Run, W of Welch Ditch, N of 24th, S of 14th), suburban and semirural neighborhood created in the 1870s and filled in through the 1940s, with commercial along Ford and at southern gateways.  Also known as East Street in recent years.

Sunshine Park (W of midblock east of Boyd, N of Highway 58, between Dogtown and Skunk Hollow), post-World War II suburban neighborhood.

Tom Cat Hill (S of 5th, E of Washington, W of Ford, N of Highway 58), one can guess how it got its name.  Middle class neighborhood which included the Swedish Lutheran Church and North School.

The campuses of the Colorado School of Mines and Lookout youth detention facility (originally State Industrial School) and Magic Mountain (Heritage Square) are historic areas in their own right.  The latter two of these, along with parts of 4 gold rush ghost town sites at the western and eastern edges of the city, and the Brickyard area are places of historic identity which have been annexed into the Golden limits.  The Grampsas Park vicinity was historically known as Orchard Home.  Golden has annexed into Pleasant View, long ago known as the Cold Spring Ranch.  Within neighborhoods are sub-areas or places autonomous from any area.  These include Kinney’s Addition (original core of South Ford Street at its north end, named for developer Calvin Kinney), Miller Place (NW part of 9th St. area, named for developer Jack Miller), Dog Hollow (Coors Wellness Center vicinity), lower 11th Street (Golden’s Chinese community), Paradise Alley (NW extremity of Goosetown, of ill repute), Golden Tourist Park (Big Tree at 22nd and Jackson, aka Sapp’s Grove), a couple areas of veterans’s homes (on 2nd Street and 23rd Street), Mines Park, Prospector Park, East Tincup (old theme park area north of Dakota Ridge RV Park, named after Pete Smythe’s fictional old west town), the Flatiron Tract (triangle bounded by 24th, Ford and South Golden Road, likely named for its shape), the row of the 2300 block of East Street, and Goldcrest (Washington Circle area, first called Goldcrest Circle).  Harmony Village and Kinney Run just about modern counterparts.

Certain places, such as the area south of City Park Heights and west of South Ford Street, have clearly been historic neighborhoods, but collective identities for them either never existed or have so far eluded me.  Many post-World War II developments have specific neighborhood names like Golden Heights, Darling View Heights, Beverly Heights, Mesa Meadows, Rimrock, Canyon Point, Mountain Ridge, Canyon View (2 of them!), Heritage Dells, Eagle Ridge, Southridge, and more.  Cemetery Hill has also been used for the area of the rise where Ulysses Park and the current Golden Cemetery are.

The History of Golden’s Neighborhood Names

Rick Gardner, Golden’s unofficial historian, wrote up a great review of the history of neighborhood names in Golden. Since this year we’ll spend some energy focusing on strengthening our neighborhoods through the Neighborhood Grant Program and an updated Comprehensive Plan, I thought it would be worth sharing his write-up (with his permission, of course):

Historically Golden was made up of two macro areas:  simply the North Side, and the South Side, divided by the river.  The North Side was more blue collar, the South Side more genteel, and there was cultural rivalry beyond geographics.  The original heart of both is the Original Town, called so on the plat.  From here Golden was made up of these neighborhoods and areas:

9th Street (N of Clear Creek, S of Highway 58, W of Arapahoe Gulch), blue collar neighborhood with industries part of it.  Originally known as Garrison Street, the original name of 9th Street.

12th Street (S of Clear Creek, W of Arapahoe, N of alley between 13th and 14th), upper middle class neighborhood of merchants and prominent citizens.  11th Street was heart of Swedish immigrant community.  Originally known as 2nd Street, the original name of 12th Street.  Eastern extreme now part of Downtown, southern extreme now part of CSM campus.

Allen’s Addition (Cluster of older homes at west 19th and Pinal Road area), named for developer Maynard C. Allen.  Upper middle class semirural estate type neighborhood created by Allen around historic farmhouse in 1920s.

Bible Flats (N of Highway 58, W of Washington, E of Canyon Point), likely named after the Swedish Lutheran Church that historically overlooked it from 5th and Washington (a poor immigrant church, the 1st Swedish church in Colorado and likely Rocky Mountains).  A middle-class-type neighborhood which developed from the 1880s-1940s.

Bunzel’s Addition (pronounced “BOON-zel”)(S of 24th Street, E of South Golden Road/Ford), named after developer Everett Bunzel.  Mixed use suburban neighborhood anchored by bowling alley developed in the 1950s.

Cemetery Hill (hill bounded by Washington, 2nd, 5th and Ford), named for the cemetery which existed nearly a century at its crest.  Developed by Joseph Dennis in the 1950s.  Also known as Graveyard Hill or Observatory Block as it was originally platted.

City Park Heights (S of 18th Street, W of Washington, E of Illinois, N of alley between 19th and 20th), named by 1890s-era realtor for City Park which formerly existed in area N of 18th, W of Arapahoe, S of 16th and E of Illinois.  Upper class neighborhood of CSM professors and prominent citizens, includes early sister school of CSM.  Park area was originally called the Public Square, also Pioneer Park, but City Park Heights is only known proper identity for the neighborhood itself.

College Hill (S of 15th Street, W of Miners Alley, E of Elm, N of 18th, excluded City Park), named after School of Mines.  Upper class neighborhood of professors, prominent citizens and CSM fraternity houses.

Court House Hill (E of Miners Alley, W of Jackson, N of midblock between 16th and 17th, S of 14th), named after Jefferson County Courthouse that stood at SE corner 15th and Washington.  Upper class neighborhood of attorneys, judges, and prominent citizens.  Includes Golden’s oldest remaining schoolhouse and Presbyterian church.

Dogtown (between Tucker Gulch and alley E of Boyd Street), likely named after prairie dog colonies in its area.  Middle class neighborhood developed by Thomas L. Clark in 1879 after he’d been ridiculed for getting worthless farmland, but he had the last laugh.  Also known as Clark’s Garden Addition.

Downtown (Highway 58 to Jackson Street extended, S to Clear Creek, E to East Street extended, S to 14th Street, W to Arapahoe Street + Calvary Church, N to Clear Creek, E to Arapahoe Gulch, N to Highway 58), the commercial, societal and cultural heart of Golden, historically part residential as well.

Golden Park Addition (N of 2nd, E of Washington, W of Ford, S of midblock north of Iowa), given name by 1873 platters William A.H. Loveland and Dr. Levi Harsh.  Never had a public park, therefore likely named similar to genteel names of the east.  Developed as middle class neighborhood after World War II.

Goosetown (W of Ford, N of Clear Creek, S of Highway 58, to eastern limits), reportedly named after either Adolph Coors’ flock of geese or the laughter of the women there.  German immigrant neighborhood which grew up around the railroad depot.  Goosetown Tavern on East Colfax Avenue was a historic business of Goosetown which was rescued and reopened by John Hickenlooper in the late 1990s.  SW extremity of Goosetown originally part of Downtown.

Skunk Hollow (E end of High Parkway), one can guess the reasoning behind its name.  Rural interface neighborhood platted by Edward L. Berthoud in 1879.  Parade fire engine is named after it.  Also known as Berthoud’s Addition.

South Ford Street (E of Kinney Run, W of Welch Ditch, N of 24th, S of 14th), suburban and semirural neighborhood created in the 1870s and filled in through the 1940s, with commercial along Ford and at southern gateways.  Also known as East Street in recent years.

Sunshine Park (W of midblock east of Boyd, N of Highway 58, between Dogtown and Skunk Hollow), post-World War II suburban neighborhood.

Tom Cat Hill (S of 5th, E of Washington, W of Ford, N of Highway 58), one can guess how it got its name.  Middle class neighborhood which included the Swedish Lutheran Church and North School.

The campuses of the Colorado School of Mines and Lookout youth detention facility (originally State Industrial School) and Magic Mountain (Heritage Square) are historic areas in their own right.  The latter two of these, along with parts of 4 gold rush ghost town sites at the western and eastern edges of the city, and the Brickyard area are places of historic identity which have been annexed into the Golden limits.  The Grampsas Park vicinity was historically known as Orchard Home.  Golden has annexed into Pleasant View, long ago known as the Cold Spring Ranch.  Within neighborhoods are sub-areas or places autonomous from any area.  These include Kinney’s Addition (original core of South Ford Street at its north end, named for developer Calvin Kinney), Miller Place (NW part of 9th St. area, named for developer Jack Miller), Dog Hollow (Coors Wellness Center vicinity), lower 11th Street (Golden’s Chinese community), Paradise Alley (NW extremity of Goosetown, of ill repute), Golden Tourist Park (Big Tree at 22nd and Jackson, aka Sapp’s Grove), a couple areas of veterans’s homes (on 2nd Street and 23rd Street), Mines Park, Prospector Park, East Tincup (old theme park area north of Dakota Ridge RV Park, named after Pete Smythe’s fictional old west town), the Flatiron Tract (triangle bounded by 24th, Ford and South Golden Road, likely named for its shape), the row of the 2300 block of East Street, and Goldcrest (Washington Circle area, first called Goldcrest Circle).  Harmony Village and Kinney Run just about modern counterparts.

Certain places, such as the area south of City Park Heights and west of South Ford Street, have clearly been historic neighborhoods, but collective identities for them either never existed or have so far eluded me.  Many post-World War II developments have specific neighborhood names like Golden Heights, Darling View Heights, Beverly Heights, Mesa Meadows, Rimrock, Canyon Point, Mountain Ridge, Canyon View (2 of them!), Heritage Dells, Eagle Ridge, Southridge, and more.  Cemetery Hill has also been used for the area of the rise where Ulysses Park and the current Golden Cemetery are.

Neighborhood Block Parties

If you’ve been thinking about organizing a block party in Golden this summer, or if you already have one queued up, you’ll be pleased to know that the city has small grants available to help with the costs of hot dogs, ice cream, and other expenses. We can also help with things like closing off a block of your street to traffic and other logistics. The application is online, and you can contact Contact Denise Hish for more information about the grant process (dhish@cityofgolden.net, 303-384-8011).

Jacob's Golden Update: Mountain Bike Skills Park and Other News

Jacob’s Golden Update: March 16, 2010

1. Mountain Bike Skills Park Gets the Green Light
2. Golden Vision Summit: March 23
3. Jackson Street Corridor: Additional Refinements
4. City Council Supports Renewable Energy Bills
5. 2010 Census Kicks Off
6. Shelton Elementary’s Big Heart
7. i-Neighbors: Beverly Heights
8. Jacob’s Golden Blog Roundup
9. Other Upcoming Events
10. Next City Council Meeting: Thursday, April 8
[Read more…]