April 20, 2018

Radio Golden is Live

Today we launched Radio Golden, an every-other-week-or-so podcast on news and politics here in Golden and Jeffco. For now, you can download the mp3 files from the RadioGolden.net website, or you can listen to them directly on the site. We are setting up the podcast through iTunes, as well, so you’ll be able to subscribe through iTunes to the Radio Golden podcast so that it downloads automatically into iTunes every time we post a new edition.

Episode #1:

  • Hosts Matt Burde, Pamela Gould, and Jacob Smith offer updates and commentary on Golden Valley and Golden City Council news, including the Golden light rail station and the South Neighborhoods Plan, Jeffco’s open space citizen survey, and a rundown on other new highlights of the past few weeks.
  • Upcoming opportunities to get involved in Golden.
  • A chat with Mayor Marjorie Sloan about City Council’s priorities and challenges for 2012.
  • Community Chatter … other news that folks are excited about.

You’ll also find the Episode #1 Extended Interview on the site, a longer interview with Mayor Sloan about the Council’s priorities and challenges.

Check it out and share your thoughts …

City Council’s Retreat: Setting the Agenda for 2012-2013

The first priority on City Council's list for 2012-2013 is supporting Golden's schools and libraries.


The Golden City Council held its biannual retreat earlier in February, focusing on their work plan for the next two years. They identified nine general areas they want to focus on: (1) supporting Golden’s schools and libraries; (2) improving public space; (3) promoting a healthy community; (4) moving the ball forward on key transportation issues; (5) strengthening Golden’s neighborhoods; (6) fostering a strong relationship with Colorado School of Mines; (7) supporting a strong economy; (8) improving on the city’s capital improvement plan; and (9) meeting the city’s sustainability goals. It’s a great list but also a pretty expansive one, and I’m looking forward to learning more about how Council is planning to prioritize among those goals.

Jeffco Open Space Survey: Results

Lair o' the Bear (Flickr: bradleygee).


Last fall, Jeffco Open Space conducted a countywide “citizen survey” to assess current attitudes and to gather feedback about the open space system. The results are available online on the Jeffco Open Space website.

A few of the findings I thought were interesting:

  • Roughly four out of every five use Jeffco Open Space facilities.
  • Crown Hill, Lair o’ the Bear, and Deer Creek Canyon were the most frequently visited of all the parks. Most of the parks in the Golden area (e.g., Galbraith, South Table) were among the less frequently visited.
  • Lair o’ the Bear was, by far, the most visited park when bringing children along.
  • Among the activities people do in the parks, hiking/walking dominated at 87% (which isn’t surprising) but wildlife viewing was fourth with 40% (which I am a bit surprised by). Mountain biking, running, and biking (I assume road) were all comparable (29%, 24%, and 21% respectively).
  • There is a high level of support for designating specific trails for single uses and multiple uses. I interpreted this to mean that many people supported the idea of some trails being designated for single uses and others for multi-use.
  • There was a much lower level of support for alternating uses on the same trails.
  • There wasn’t much support for designating entire parks for a single type of trail use.
  • The formal survey found that 9% of respondents felt that current operating hours of open space parks are inadequate, while 41% of the online respondents felt that way. I know for runners (and maybe for others) this is a big issue, especially in the winter. For many folks who have a regular workweek, you can’t run on trails during the week in the winter except before dawn or after dark.

I’d love to know if you see anything in the results you are especially surprised or intrigued by.

Jeffco Considers “Future Development” Rezoning Request on South Table Mountain

Castle Rock on South Table Mountain (thanks to Preston Driggers for the photo).

Among the most important open space accomplishments of the past couple of decades in Golden is the protection of South Table Mountain. Although South Table is mostly outside the city limits, it plays a critical part in protecting Golden’s small-town and historic character by helping buffer us from the impacts of regional growth in the Denver Metro area. Much of South Table is protected under Jeffco’s open space program, but the property owners of one important parcel are now asking the county to change the zoning designation from “open space” to “future development.” the forty acres in question are on the top of South Table Mountain at the end of the dirt road that extends from Quaker Street.

If you have any comments on this proposal, here are two good options (and you can do both): 1) You can send an email to Heather Gutherless (hgutherl@jeffco.us), the staff planner that is guiding the Central Plans Community Plan for the county, or 2) you can attend the county planning commission public hearing on Wednesday (Sept. 14) at Hearing Room 1 in the County Building. The public hearing is scheduled to start at 6:15 p.m.

Many people in this community have worked very hard for a long time to protect South Table Mountain, and it’s important that Jeffco staff – which is presently supporting the current “open space” designation – hear from community members that support their position.

Jacob's Golden Update: Golden Seeks Stimulus Funding for the U.S. 6 /19th Street Intersection and Other News

Jacob’s Golden Update: August 13, 2009

1. Golden Seeks Stimulus Funding for the U.S. 6 /19th Street Intersection
2. Golden’s Light Rail Construction Underway
3. New Noise Berm Along 6th Avenue
4. Bachman Open Space Proposal Earns Jeffco Support
5. Community Bus Feasibility Study
6. Refinancing the City’s Drainage Utility Bonds
7. Museum Lawsuit Settlement in the Works
8. City Council Considers Changes to Trash Hauling
9. Golden Marlins Take High Honors
10. Other Upcoming Events
11. Next City Council Meeting: Thursday, August 13 (tonight)

**********
[Read more...]

Jacob’s Golden Update: Golden Seeks Stimulus Funding for the U.S. 6 /19th Street Intersection and Other News

Jacob’s Golden Update: August 13, 2009

1. Golden Seeks Stimulus Funding for the U.S. 6 /19th Street Intersection
2. Golden’s Light Rail Construction Underway
3. New Noise Berm Along 6th Avenue
4. Bachman Open Space Proposal Earns Jeffco Support
5. Community Bus Feasibility Study
6. Refinancing the City’s Drainage Utility Bonds
7. Museum Lawsuit Settlement in the Works
8. City Council Considers Changes to Trash Hauling
9. Golden Marlins Take High Honors
10. Other Upcoming Events
11. Next City Council Meeting: Thursday, August 13 (tonight)

**********
[Read more...]

Open Space, Ref. C, and Bus Terminals

Late last week I attended a briefing, hosted by the Transit Alliance, on the Union Station project in downtown Denver. I will tell you I think it's an amazingly cool project which will integrate local city buses, regional buses, light rail, Amtrack, Greyhound and other bus services, and every other kind of transit you can think of under one roof. Although I will be sad to see all the open space of the South Platte Valley (near LoDo in downtown Denver) vanish, if they pull this off it will be urban infill done right, and the entire Denver region will benefit from the incredible transit center that Union Station becomes. They just released the Draft Environmental Impact Statement in case you want to dig into the details, but if you are more interested in the quick overview of what it will all look like I suggest RTD's power point presentation.Union Station has a lengthy history, and as best I can tell the project will do a good job of preserving its historic character and the large, open plaza despite the substantial expansion of the building and the complex.

This week I attended the TransitWest meeting and learned more about efforts on the I-70 corridor to push CDOT to consider something other than their typical "maximum asphalt" solution to congestion.

I also attended a briefing sponsored by the Bell Policy Center and a large bipartisan group of state legislators. They offered the clearest explanation of the state budget process I've ever heard, and made very clear that they are honoring their promises during the Ref. C campaign regarding how the legislature would spend Ref. C funds. The take-home message was pretty clear: Ref. C is allowing the state to tread water with respect to many critical programs like community colleges and other higher education funding needs, services for the mentally ill and the poor, transportation projects, K-12 education, and health care. I asked the distinguished panel (which included Senate Majority Leader Joan Fitz-Gerald, our own State Senator Moe Keller, and our own State House Representative Gwyn Green) where in this process they would establish reasonable sideboards on their transportation funding to ensure that CDOT appropriately prioritizes funding for transit and appropriately considers the needs of local communities before ramming careless, ineffective, and expensive projects down their throats. No one had a particularly satisfying answer ("this is just the appropriations process and those are policy questions"), although to Representative Green's credit she did politely point out the way in which many in the state legislature defer to CDOT's arm twisting. I think decisions about appropriations are policy decisions, and the legislature has a responsibility to ensure that CDOT and all other state agencies spend the taxpayers money appropriately.

Finally, this evening I attended Plan Jeffco's annual banquet, which was in part a celebration of the protection of the Ralston property and some adjacent land owned by the Mt. Vernon Country Club. Lots of folks deserve credit for pulling off the deal, including the Northwoodside Foundation, Clear Creek Land Conservancy, Jefferson County Open Space, Mt. Vernon Country Club, and of course Plan Jeffco. I like celebrations, and celebrating the protection of important open space is particularly satisfying.